Malachi Lui

Malachi Lui  |  Oct 30, 2020  |  First Published: Oct 30, 2020  |  5 comments
(Review Explosion is a recurring AnalogPlanet feature covering recent releases for which we either don’t have sufficient time to fully explore, or that are not worthy of it. Curated by AnalogPlanet contributing editor Malachi Lui, Review Explosion focuses on the previous few months’ new releases.)

Malachi Lui  |  Oct 30, 2020  |  4 comments
Shortly after their 1970 sophomore album Fun House’s release, Detroit proto-punk legends the Stooges played the Goose Lake Festival in Jackson, Michigan, 80 miles west of Detroit. Intended to be a Midwest Woodstock of sorts, with acts like the Small Faces, Jethro Tull, and Chicago (among many more) the 3-day festival drew 200,000 attendees over a stifling weekend. The environment became tense; in this LP’s liner notes, Jaan Uhelszki writes of 500 people attending the Open City LSD bad trip rescue tent, with countless others also being stoned on PCP masquerading as cocaine. Still, the festival itself was well-organized. Bands played on a rotating stage, were limited to 45-minute sets without exception, and a six-foot fence and trench blocked performer/crowd interaction.

Malachi Lui  |  Oct 24, 2020  |  1 comments
As promised in the original Starz vinyl report, I got the standard edition to compare to the disappointing glow-in-the-dark 2LP.

Malachi Lui  |  Oct 19, 2020  |  First Published: Oct 19, 2020  |  6 comments
(Review Explosion is a recurring AnalogPlanet feature covering recent releases for which we either don’t have sufficient time to fully explore, or that are not worthy of it. Curated by AnalogPlanet contributing editor Malachi Lui, this particular Review Explosion focuses on new and old 7” releases.)

Malachi Lui  |  Oct 02, 2020  |  First Published: Oct 02, 2020  |  29 comments
(Review Explosion is a recurring AnalogPlanet feature covering recent releases for which we either don’t have sufficient time to fully explore, or that are not worthy of it. Curated by AnalogPlanet contributing editor Malachi Lui, Review Explosion focuses on the previous few months’ new releases.)

Malachi Lui  |  Oct 01, 2020  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2020  |  4 comments
(Review Explosion is a recurring AnalogPlanet feature covering recent releases for which we either don’t have sufficient time to fully explore, or that are not worthy of it. Curated by AnalogPlanet contributing editor Malachi Lui, this is the second RSD2020-centric Review Explosion, the first of which is found here.)

Last weekend, the second 2020 RSD Drop occurred in physical stores and on some online outlets. I didn’t find any titles terribly important to me, so here I am still reviewing records from the initial August RSD Drop. Onward we go…

Malachi Lui  |  Sep 30, 2020  |  First Published: Sep 30, 2020  |  33 comments
(Vinyl Reports is an AnalogPlanet feature aiming to create a definitive guide to vinyl LPs. Here, we talk about sound quality, LP packaging, music, and the overarching vinyl experience.)

Malachi Lui  |  Sep 21, 2020  |  First Published: Sep 21, 2020  |  9 comments
Today (September 21), record club Vinyl Me, Please formally announced the latest in their VMP Anthology box set series, The Story of Herbie Hancock. Bernie Grundman cut all-analog from tape where possible, GZ pressed the eight albums over 11 LPs on 180g black vinyl and packaged in tip-on jackets. The set retails for $349 and includes a “deluxe” booklet. Curated by Hancock himself, the chosen titles are: Takin’ Off (1962, all-analog), Maiden Voyage (1965, AAA), Head Hunters (1973, AAA), The V.S.O.P. Quintet: Live Under The Sky (1979, digitally recorded), The Piano (1979, AAA), Future Shock (1983, AAA), 1+1 (1997, digitally recorded), and River: The Joni Letters (2007, digitally recorded). Live Under The Sky, a 1979 Japanese CBS/Sony Master Sound live album recorded digitally, is newly re-sequenced and amended at Herbie Hancock’s request. The box set shipping this winter is housed in a two-piece box hand-numbered to 1500 units.

Malachi Lui  |  Aug 31, 2020  |  First Published: Aug 31, 2020  |  19 comments
This year for Record Store Day, I joined the Music Millennium line at 5:40 AM. Because of COVID-19 restrictions, they let 10 customers inside the store at once, and enforced social distancing in line. When the sun rose around 6:00, owner Terry Currier handed out tickets corresponding to our spots in line, with specific time slots to arrive back later and shop. I left and arrived back at 8:15, ultimately going over my expected budget and buying 10 records. I’m still processing the Bowie, Tyler, Clipping, and Ron Carter releases (another RSD-themed Review Explosion of those coming soon), but below are reviews of my other pickups (I also bought a copy of Angel Olsen’s latest album Whole New Mess for a general Vinyl Review Explosion).

Malachi Lui  |  Aug 20, 2020  |  First Published: Aug 20, 2020  |  31 comments
After two COVID-19-induced delays, Record Store Day 2020 is finally (sort of) happening. Instead of the usual huge event, in an attempt to “socially distance” RSD, the releases will drop on three Saturdays over as many months. These “RSD Drops” occur August 29, September 26, and October 24, and in my opinion might fail the social distancing test. In particular, the August 29 drop has huge releases with diverse audiences; I predict that this first drop will be rather busy, leaving the latter two far emptier. I’ll be lining up early at Music Millennium on August 29 (last year’s event at Everyday Music was unsuccessful) for a large set of releases. Here are this year’s most noteworthy RSD items:

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