Michael Fremer

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Michael Fremer  |  Nov 27, 2017  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2000  |  2 comments
Joni Mitchell played The Theater at Madison Square Garden recently, supporting her new CD, Both Sides Now. Mitchell with symphony orchestra sounded like a no-brainer, so we got tickets, though by the time my friend was able to get through online to Ticketmaster the best seats were gone. We got second-best accommodations for $75, which seemed reasonable, given the cost of rehearsing an orchestra, then traipsing around the country with it.
Michael Fremer  |  Nov 26, 2017  |  First Published: Nov 26, 2017  |  8 comments
Don Was, community organizer. Who would have thought? There's long been a Blue Note "community" but it's a loose knit, worldwide group of like-minded label enthusiasts that have kept the Blue Note flame glowing. The fans remained true even as the company changed hands, lost artistic focus, engaged in self-exploitation and occasionally tried to re-invent itself into something it was not.

Michael Fremer  |  Nov 26, 2017  |  6 comments
After the messy "supergroup" hype surrounding Blind Faith—more a one-off money maker than a group formed to last—Eric Clapton decided to downplay his fame and so was born in 1970 Derek and the Dominoes and the Layla... double LP that initially flopped. Many people today forget that, but flop it did. It didn't help that it was a costly double LP by an "unknown" group.

Michael Fremer  |  Nov 22, 2017  |  0 comments
BS&T fans fall into 4 camps: the 1st which prefers the Al Kooper led original group and the album Child is Father to the Man, the 2nd that prefers only the second eponymously titled album, which was the group's most popular, the 3rd camp that loves the first two albums and the 4th camp that loves all of the group's albums. This box is definitely for them.

Michael Fremer  |  Nov 20, 2017  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2000  |  14 comments
A pleasant surprise arrived at my door the other day: the 180gm vinyl edition of Companion, the Patricia Barber album released last year on Premonition/Blue Note. According to the jacket, the six-track set, impeccably recorded live in Chicago last July by Jim Anderson, was mastered from a 24-bit transfer of an analog recording. You can bet the vinyl sounds better than the 16-bit CD—at less than 20 minutes a side, there's plenty of room for the recording's full dynamics.
Michael Fremer  |  Nov 20, 2017  |  2 comments
That new record you just unboxed probably came shrink-wrapped or in a perforated sealed bag. Maybe it has a sticker or two on it or it's a numbered limited edition. Watch how all of this happens in this just produced video shot at Furnace Manufacturing with founder Eric Astor. And then go to Furnace's brand new, soon to be operational vinyl pressing plant that will also incorporate the packaging facility, which has outgrown its current location. Furnace began in the 1990s as a production and packaging agent for indie and major labels—perhaps you’re unsure about what that exactly means. After watching the video you will—and perhaps you'll come to appreciate an LP production cost you've not before considered.

Michael Fremer  |  Nov 16, 2017  |  First Published: Nov 16, 2017  |  3 comments
VPI just announced a stand-alone dedicated moving magnet phono preamplifier based upon the circuit in the Player turntable's built-in unit.

Michael Fremer  |  Nov 15, 2017  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2000  |  4 comments
If you were preparing to archive your LPs to CD-R, what would you do first? Right. You'd scrub your records and whip your turntable into shape—maybe even upgrade your cartridge and/or phono section. In March The New York Times's "Circuits" section published "Janis and Jimi, Come Back from the Attic," an article about digitizing and archiving vinyl that I don't think even mentioned the word "turntable." Obviously, analog is news unfit to print.

Michael Fremer  |  Nov 13, 2017  |  First Published: Nov 13, 2017  |  34 comments
Just going to reproduce much of the press release this time:

Blue Note Records introduces Blue Note Review: Volume One - Peace, Love & Fishing, the inaugural edition of a stunning new biannual, limited edition, luxury boxset subscription series that encapsulates the storied past and auspicious future of the legendary jazz label. The beautifully curated collector's item is a limited production of 1,500 sets, and is available to order today for $200 exclusively at bluenotereview.com. Watch an unboxing video of the Blue Note Review set at that URL.

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